Choose Your Own Adventure at Cascade Falls in Pembroke, VA

Written by
Jason Barnette
Posted on
August 7, 2014
Share story
Written by
Jason Barnette
Posted on
August 7th, 2014
Share story

I had heard about the raging, magnificent Cascade Falls for years. I had seen photos captured during the summer and winter months. Dozens of people had recommended I visit this place. But I was not prepared for the adventure ahead or the majesty of what I was about to find. I was about to embark on a three-hour tour of the Appalachian Mountains that I would never forget!

When I was a kid I was a huge fan of Choose-Your-Own-Adventure books. I used to read them day after day, reaching an end I may or may not have liked, then returning to the beginning to start it all over again. I would explore every outcome, every scenario, until I had reached every possible conclusion with a big smile on my face. When I was in high school I would spend my free time trying to write choose your own adventure stories in the Star Trek universe (yes, I was an epic nerd and I still am!).

Well, now I get to write my first choose-your-own-adventure professionally. During my long trek back to the parking lot (don’t worry, you’ll reach this point in the adventure soon enough) I began thinking about how I could write this travel story. There are certainly a lot of decisions to be made during the trek to the falls. But when I thought about the choose-your-own-adventure style I almost ran back to my car just so I could start writing! Almost. I mostly just walked.

Instructions

As you read this travel story you will come across decisions you must make to help shape your adventure. At each moment, you will have two or three options to select. Click on the option you wish to take, and the story will automatically jump to that point so you can continue the adventure. If you get the words “The End”, the story’s over for you! But the adventure continues.

If at any time you want to return to the previous decision and make another choice, all you need to do is press the “back” button on your browser or swipe to the right on mobile devices. This will return you to the previous spot only, where you can make another choice. If only life were that simple!

Introduction: The Parking Area

All adventures must have a beginning, so we start at the parking area. Getting to the Cascade Falls Recreation Area is easy, but takes a bit of time, along a two lane road from the heart of Pembroke, through a residential area, to a dead end at the parking area. The area is large enough to accommodate about 20-30 vehicles at a single time. You must pay $3 per vehicle to park, so be sure to have some cash with you! I never carry cash, so I had to dig out twelve quarters to pay.

The parking area includes a large picnic area with a few tables and open areas of grass to lay down a blanket. There is also a restroom facility nearby. However, I did not find any water fountains at the area so be sure to bring water with you for the adventure. You will definitely need it!

At one end of the parking area you will find a path where the adventure begins. A large map on a covered board lays out the options I am writing about here. If you want, take a cellphone photo of the map so you can refer to it while hiking the trail.

Before we begin, however, you need to make sure you have the proper attire and equipment for this hike. It’s not exactly an easy journey and you can easily find yourself hurting by the time you return if you don’t follow these guidelines.

  • Wear proper shoes. Tennis shoes are okay, trail runners or hiking shoes are better. Do not wear flip flops, sandals, or anything else with soft bottoms. There are a lot of rocks and roots on this trail and you can hurt the bottom of your feet or your ankles with bad shoes.
  • Bug spray can help. I didn’t come across any mosquitoes and only a few gnats, but I would imagine both could be a problem after a heavy summer rain.
  • Water. Bring at least 1 liter of water for each person in the group. It’s a hefty hike up there so you will definitely need something. Some of the locals who have been visiting the falls for years told me it is safe to drink the water from Little Stoney Creek, however I could not verify this with any park rangers. Proceed at your own risk, unless you want to bring a water filter bottle.
  • Trekking poles. The lower trail is rocky and strewn with roots. Trekking poles can help you maintain balance while walking across these areas, which can reduce wear and tear on your knees and prevent accidents.
  • Leave the stroller in the car. The upper trail is relatively smooth, but still covered with gravels. Unless you have a battery-powered off-road stroller, it will be more work than it is worth.
  • Snack food. As you will read about in a few more minutes, it is a hefty and long hike to see the falls. I would suggest power bars or fruit snack bars, maybe some kind of protein chips. Bring some fruit for the children. You may want a snack once you reach the falls. Or, if you’re like me, bring an entire picnic!

The Adventure Begins

So you’re all loaded up and ready for the hike? Just as I started my adventure on this trail I noticed a family ahead of me with two children heading along the Upper Trail. Another family with two dogs took the Lower Trail. I shifted the weight of my 30-pound photography backpack, tightened up the straps, and began moving. The map at the parking area stated the elevation from the trail head to the falls included a roughly 750′ ascent up the mountain. Don’t be discouraged by this! It is a very gradual climb so I am confident anyone can make it. However, the “moderate” rating of the trail is complete bull. I would rate this trail strenuous with a note for people with walking disabilities: if you need a walking stick or cane, you can make the journey but it will take awhile. I would not recommend this trail if you find yourself in pain after spending a few hours walking each day.

The first few hundred feet are deceptively easy. The path is wide, flat, and easy to walk. It will be nice once you return to this point later. But then, almost out of nowhere, you reach the first decision: a wooden footbridge crosses over Little Stoney Creek, while anther path continues on straight ahead up the mountain.

Crossing over the bridge takes you the Lower Trail. The Lower Trail is the easier path at this point, but it is also strewn with rocks and roots which will make it difficult for young children. It’s also the most scenic route, winding right along the creek. If you choose this path, you will be able to switch the Upper Trail in one mile.

Sticking to the Upper Trail at this point is more strenuous, but easier on the body. It is a steady climb upwards, but the path is wide and covered with small-sized gravels. It is actually a big giant tease because you can constantly hear the trickling of the creek below, but during the green summer months you can’t see the water below.

If you decide to cross over the bridge to the Lower Trail, click here.

If you think you would rather take the more strenuous, but easier to hike, Upper Trail, click here.

Water rushes through a narrow gap in boulders along the lower trail at Cascade Falls Recreation Area in Pembroke, VA on Wednesday, July 30, 2014. Copyright 2014 Jason Barnette Cascade Falls is a 66' waterfall location at the end of a 4-mile loop hiking trail through fairly rough terrain in a dense forest. It is managed by the National Forest Service and the recreation area includes a paved parking lot (day-use only, fee required), a picnic area, and a restroom facility.

Water rushes through a narrow gap in boulders along the Lower Trail.

The wooden bridge is sturdy, but if you’re like me and jump up and down in the middle it will bounce just a little (I hope I never grow up). Once you cross over to the Lower Trail, the scenic adventure truly begins. Little Stoney Creek flows from Cascade Falls through the recreation area, so you are approaching the falls from the bottom. The Lower Trail stays very close to the creek as it winds through the dense forest.

Along the trail you will see several places for a stop to catch your breath, enjoy the view, or even have a small picnic. There are a few benches spaced along the trail as well. One of the places I came across is shown in the photo at the top: A beautiful shallow pond with a small waterfall churning nearby. This is the sort of place where you could let the dog swim, or maybe let some young children play since it is so shallow.

The Lower Trail is certainly scenic and peaceful, but it’s also difficult to traverse. A few places have flat paths and even a few constructed paths that look almost like stone retaining walls along the creek. But many places have large, jagged rocks or roots protruding from the ground. This is where a pair of trekking poles can come in handy. I almost slipped on one rock and would have taken quite a tumble if not for my trekking poles. This could also be difficult or even dangerous for young children, especially if they enjoy to run ahead or have a knack for climbing boulders.

After the first mile you reach another wooden footbridge. At this point, you are halfway through the complete journey. The minimum time to complete this part of the adventure is about 30-40 minutes, a little bit longer if you have children or difficulty walking. If you have already had enough, you can take the Upper Trail back to the parking lot, or you can return along the Lower Trail the way you just came.

However, you can continue another mile to Cascade Falls. The Lower Trail is still rocky and rooty, but even more scenic than the first half. However, if you want an easier climb the rest of the way to the falls you can take the Upper Trail to the waterfall.

If you want to return to the parking lot on the easy-to-hike Upper Trail, click here.

Or if you want to return to the parking lot on the scenic Lower Trail, click here.

But if you have a hankering to see Cascade Falls, and want to take the scenic but difficult Lower Trail, click here.

However, if you want to see Cascade Falls but enjoy a bit of an easier hike the final mile along the Upper Trail, click here.

So you decided to take the long climb to the waterfall on the Upper Trail, huh? That’s alright…it may be a long climb up, but it is easier on the feet and the knees. The Upper Trail is a steady climb from the parking area to just near Cascade Falls, but the path is level from side to side and covered with small-sized gravels to make walking easier.

Heading in this direction will take a bit longer because you are constantly walking uphill, as opposed to the Lower Trail that stays relatively level during the first half. But this is definitely the path you want to take if you have young children or if you have difficulty walking. You will find a few benches every once in awhile so you can take a break, or you can trudge onwards knowing the reward at the end.

At the halfway point (one mile) you will see a sign post pointing toward the Lower Trail. At this point, you can take a small connector trail down the side of the mountain to the Lower Trail and continue along that path the base of the falls. It is more scenic, but still more difficult than the Upper Trail.

You can continue along the Upper Trail which is less scenic (there is one nice spot) but an easier climb to a point just above the falls. At the end of the Upper Trail you will have a hefty climb down, but you will find built-in steps to help you make the journey.

You can also turn around at this point if you’ve already had enough for the day. At this point it is almost exactly one mile back to the parking area. If you want the scenic trip home you can take the Lower Trail, but the faster and easier path is the Upper Trail.

If you want to climb down to the Lower Trail for a more scenic route to Cascade Falls, click here.

But if you want to continue along the Upper Trail for an easier climb, click here.

However, if you just want to go home, but you want the scenic route on the Lower Trail, click here.

If you want to take the fast and easy route home on the Upper Trail, click here.

Water runs off the sheer cliffs along the lower trail at Cascade Falls Recreation Area in Pembroke, VA on Wednesday, July 30, 2014. Copyright 2014 Jason Barnette Cascade Falls is a 66' waterfall location at the end of a 4-mile loop hiking trail through fairly rough terrain in a dense forest. It is managed by the National Forest Service and the recreation area includes a paved parking lot (day-use only, fee required), a picnic area, and a restroom facility.

Water runs off the sheer cliffs along the Lower Trail.

The second half of the Lower Trail begins at the second wooden footbridge crossing over to the left side of Little Stoney Creek. This section of the Lower Trail is just as scenic as the first, though you have more hills to climb in small spurts. It is also just as rocky and rooty as the first half, which makes this the most strenuous option.

As the Lower Trail continues, it begins to climb up above the creek below. This is okay, though, because you already had plenty of places to play in the water on the first half of the Lower Trail (if you took that path)! As it climbs higher, you come across a few of my favorite spots on the Lower Trail. First, you cross a small wooden footbridge across a narrow gap on the side of the creek with a beautiful view of the water twisting below.

But the next view is my favorite (besides the falls themselves, that is). The Lower Trail begins a steady climb upwards along a series of steps, eventually flattening out about 50′ above the creek. Off to your right, across the creek, is a sheer cliff wall. If you look closely, and it has rained enough recently, you can see water streaming down the cliff face into the creek below (shown in the photo above). If you want the best view of this scene, take a few more steps up the trail and look for a small side trail on the left. It will take you up about 10′ above the Lower Trail and there is a bench to catch your breath and enjoy the view! Some of the locals told me these locations will freeze solid during bitter cold winter months and you can see the icicles hanging from the rock walls. Trust me when I say: I will be returning here during a 20-degree winter day to see if this holds true!

At this point you are only about a quarter-mile from Cascade Falls. The trail mostly stays level, but the height of the creek below increases as you continue up the Lower Trail. Just before you reach the falls, the trail and creek are on even ground again and you will find a stunning view. The creek is wide, shallow, and the trail is right alongside. I would imagine this path is flooded during periods of great rain, and almost slippery and a bit dangerous during icy conditions.

By now you can probably hear the roaring of the falls nearby. As you take another small turn on the Lower Trail you suddenly catch your first sight of the cascading 66′ tall waterfall. It will probably take your breath away, just as it did mine. It is a beautiful canvas of nature to behold, but also a testament to the fact you finished the 750′ ascent across two miles of rocky terrain to reach it. I think this would be a small personal victory even for the most rugged outdoors person.

If you would like to sit down, relax, and enjoy some time at Cascade Falls, click here.

But if you need to start heading back and you want to take the easier Upper Trail, click here.

However, if you want to take the scenic route back along the Lower Trail, click here.

The second half of the Upper Trail begins from a small connector trail near the second wooden footbridge on the Lower Trail. From here it is a pretty easy climb for the final mile to a point just above Cascade Falls. It is an easy climb, but you’re still climbing uphill the entire way.

This part of the Upper Trail climbs higher above Little Stoney Creek, but it’s actually still within sight of the Lower Trail about 50′ below. You can see other people walking the trail below, and soon you’ll pass an unforgettable landmark that you can also see from the Lower Trail.

Probably about halfway up the second half of the Upper Trail you’ll pass an enormous rock wall on the left. The sheer rock wall stands like a guardian along the trail, though I’m not sure what it could be guarding visitors from. Stunning natural beauty? Moments of glee and excitement? Whatever it is, it’s enormous and worth a photo or two. Some of the locals told me when they were kids visiting the falls during the winter they would snap off icicles and eat them on the way back down. They said they never got sick because the rocks act as a natural filter, but then again kids’ immune systems can handle a bit more than adults’ can.

You actually reach the highest point about 8/10 of a mile up the trail before beginning a long descent down the falls. One of the cons of taking the Upper Trail is you don’t hear the rushing waters of the falls as early as you do on the less-obstructed Lower Trail. A set of steps begins the journey down, twisting and turning, until at last you turn a corner and catch your first glimpse.

At this point your are just below the top level of Cascade Falls. You have a beautiful introductory view to the falls. As you continue the path down you will come across a fork in the path. The left takes you to a viewing area about 30′ below the top of the falls. The right will take you down to the middle observation overlook about 10′ above the water level. Whichever way you decide to go first, you should stop and pat yourself on the back. However you chose to get here, you made it, and it is a glorious personal achievement for any living human being.

If you would like to sit down, relax, and enjoy some time at Cascade Falls, click here.

But if you need to start heading back and you want to take the easier Upper Trail, click here.

However, if you want to take the scenic route back along the Lower Trail, click here.

Sitting at the edge of the pool at the bast of Cascade Falls Recreation Area in Pembroke, VA on Wednesday, July 30, 2014. Copyright 2014 Jason Barnette Cascade Falls is a 66' waterfall location at the end of a 4-mile loop hiking trail through fairly rough terrain in a dense forest. It is managed by the National Forest Service and the recreation area includes a paved parking lot (day-use only, fee required), a picnic area, and a restroom facility.

Sitting at the edge of the pool at the base of Cascade Falls.

Cascade Falls is a towering 66′ waterfall crashing over an exposed rock face. The sound of the rushing water is loud, but hardly drowns out normal conversation. The entire area sits in a bit of a bowl, surrounded by towering evergreens and lush rhododendron, providing a cool atmosphere on even the hottest of summer days.

At the base of the waterfall is a giant pond, or a small lake, however you want to look at it. The water is, of course, a cool mountain temperature. But the water is just deep enough for kids, adults, and pets to enjoy some swimming without fear of losing someone entirely. I only walked out until it was knee-deep, and it did not look much deeper than that. When I was a kid my parents took my brother, sister, our dog, and myself for a hike at Grayson Highlands State Park. We went on the Wilson Creek Trail that features a series of small waterfalls, each with a small pond at the base. My dad waited until we found the largest pond to toss our dog into the water to remind her she was born with the natural instinct to swim. Well…the toss was a little too strong and she broke her tail. It was always a little crooked after that.

Now, I’m certainly not suggesting, nor could I condone, anyone diving into this water. It’s just not deep enough. However, I saw several people with children and dogs so this is definitely a family and pet-friendly destination to visit. I spent about an hour just sitting near the edge of the water, splashing my feet around (mostly just to keep my toes warm), listening to the roaring sound of a peaceful nature.

It is a bit tricky, and probably not possible at all, to walk across some rocks at the edge of the pond to a rocky “island” in the middle of the creek. Several families had spread out blankets to enjoy a picnic while children and pets swam in the water. However, I would imagine this “island” to be flooded during periods of high water levels so you may not find this when you arrive. If the water is also relatively low, you can continue across the creek to a rocky “shore” on the other side that leads you to the base of the waterfall. A few people asked to have their photos taken here (people always ask the photographer to shoot their photo) as a way of saying, “Yes, I made it!”

If the water levels are high, or the water just too cold to trudge through, you can sit on the small wooden observation overlook about 10′ above the water nearby, or continue to the upper overlook about 30′ higher. Both of these still provide stunning views of the falls without dealing with the water.

This is certainly a place you can spend an hour, several hours, or an entire day. Bring some food, have some water, enjoy the peacefulness. However, remember one thing for certain: the recreation area closes at sunset, and it will take at least 50 minutes to return the parking area. Don’t get caught out too late!

One Thing Not to Do at Cascade Falls

I experienced one of my worst nightmares as a travel photographer while visiting Cascade Falls: I captured a fantastic moment of something I thought was great, only to later realize it was highly illegal and severely punishable. What am I talking about? Climbing up the waterfall.

There are several signs posted around the pond advising people not to climb the waterfall. It is dangerous, and according to the signs people have died trying. A lot of local Virginia Tech University students have told me over the years that visiting Cascade Falls is a right of passage, something every Hokie needs to do just once. I’m not saying Tech students are the only ones who climbs the falls, or that they all do, but while I was visiting the falls a group of college-aged boys climbed up the falls to stand on the top.

There I was, standing at the bottom, snapping away photos, only to learn from a park ranger a few days later that it was highly illegal. There is a steep fine to pay if you get caught up there, but nothing is steeper than losing your life if you slip and fall. The moral of the story? Don’t do it. It’s not cool, nobody really cares that you made it up there, and if you die you do not get to reset to the last point you saved and try it all over again.

Once you have finished your enjoyment at the falls, and you finally manage to pull yourself away, it is time to begin the trek home. You can take the easiest path along the Upper Trail for a straight-shot, downhill trek all the way back to the parking area. But you can also take the more scenic route home along the Lower Trail, with an option to switch later. What will you choose next?

If you want to take the scenic route along the Lower Trail, click here.

However, if you just want the easy path home along the Upper Trail, click here.

Returning along this half of the Lower Trail is actually the most fun. It is still a beautiful view as you put the falls at your back and head downstream, but you pass through some really beautiful scenery along the way. This is especially helpful if you did not take the Lower Trail to reach the falls to begin with.

At first you will wind alongside Little Stoney Creek before beginning a gradual climb above the water. Eventually you will rise about 50′ above the creek and find a beautiful view of a sheer rock wall across the creek. If you look closely, and it has rained enough recently, you can see water streaming down the cliff face into the creek below (shown in the photo above). If you want the best view of this scene, take a few more steps up the trail and look for a small side trail on the left. It will take you up about 10′ above the Lower Trail and there is a bench to catch your breath and enjoy the view! Some of the locals told me these locations will freeze solid during bitter cold winter months and you can see the icicles hanging from the rock walls. Trust me when I say: I will be returning here during a 20-degree winter day to see if this holds true!

Once you continue the trek down the Lower Trail, it gets quite a bit easier for awhile. The path heads down a series of steps, bringing you level with the water once again. It is an easy trek at this point, bringing you to the second wooden footbridge from the parking area. At this point, you can decide to continue along the Lower Trail, or take the short connector trail for a small climb to the Upper Trail.

If you want to continue the scenic route along the Lower Trail, click here.

However if you just want to get home on the Upper Trail, click here.

When you begin the trek back to the parking area along the Upper Trail from Cascade Falls, you will immediately face a daunting climb up the steep mountain. A set of steps makes it relatively easy, but you will climb up about 100′ in elevation within the first few minutes of leaving the falls. With your back the falls and a lush grove of evergreens surrounding the path, the roaring sound of the crashing water will fade quickly.

As you reach the top of the steps the path continues down to the left. To the right you will see what looks like a path. Do not take this path. Yes, it will lead around to the top of the falls. But if you did not already ready about, scroll up a bit to see why you should not visit the top of Cascade Falls. Instead, ignore the temptation to do something illegal and instead turn left and begin the glorious trek down the mountain.

The Upper Trail is definitely the easiest route to take back to the parking area. It is a steady downhill grade on a smooth path, which is just perfect for anyone whose feet are throbbing after the rocky ascent on the Lower Trail. Probably about halfway down the this section of the Upper Trail you’ll pass an enormous rock wall on the left. The sheer rock wall stands like a guardian along the trail, though I’m not sure what it could be guarding visitors from. Stunning natural beauty? Moments of glee and excitement? Whatever it is, it’s enormous and worth a photo or two. Some of the locals told me when they were kids visiting the falls during the winter they would snap off icicles and eat them on the way back down. They said they never got sick because the rocks act as a natural filter, but then again kids’ immune systems can handle a bit more than adults’ can.

You will pass a sign post with a sign marking down to the Lower Trail and Cascade Falls in .3 miles, and pointing down the trail to the parking area in 1.7 miles. Don’t worry too much about this connector path. This does not lead to the second wooden footbridge and will really only take you backwards a bit, making the trek home longer.

It will take about 25 minutes to hike down the one mile from the falls to the connector trail that can take you over to the Lower Trail and the second footbridge. At this point, you could just continue straight on down the Upper Trail and arrive at the parking lot in about another 25 minutes. However, if you would like to enjoy some of the scenic beauty along Little Stoney Creek one last time, take the connector trail over to the Lower Trail.

If you would like to head on home on the Upper Trail, click here.

But if you want some more scenery on the Lower Trail, click here.

Once you cross that wooden footbridge and begin the Lower Trail back to the parking area, you are only 30 minutes from your car. You still have a mile left to cross, but it’s a mile of scenic beauty along the Little Stoney Creek. There are many places to stop for a short break along this section of the Lower Trail and since you are so close to the parking area it would be fine to take a detour or make a stop even if the sun is getting low in the sky (remember, the recreation area closes at sunset).

Along the trail you will see several places for a stop to catch your breath, enjoy the view, or even have a small picnic. There are a few benches spaced along the trail as well. One of the places I came across is shown in the photo at the top: A beautiful shallow pond with a small waterfall churning nearby. This is the sort of place where you could let the dog swim, or maybe let some young children play since it is so shallow.

The Lower Trail is certainly scenic and peaceful, but it’s also difficult to traverse. A few places have flat paths and even a few constructed paths that look almost like stone retaining walls along the creek. But many places have large, jagged rocks or roots protruding from the ground. This is where a pair of trekking poles can come in handy. I almost slipped on one rock and would have taken quite a tumble if not for my trekking poles. This could also be difficult or even dangerous for young children, especially if they enjoy to run ahead or have a knack for climbing boulders.

Finally, you will cross the last footbridge, reconnect with the Upper Trail, and continue for about five minutes to the parking area. You have completed your 4-mile (possibly more, depending on which choices you made) adventure to Cascade Falls.

The End.

At this point the parking area is just a simple, downhill 25-minute walk along the Upper Trail. It is not very scenic, mostly just a wide path with shrubbery and evergreens on either side. But the most important part is that you are almost back to the parking area.

Although this area is not very scenic, there are still a few benches where you can catch your breath and enjoy some moments with nature. There is one particular place where the path widens and a bench sits in a little nook on the trail, perfect for people going up and down. This is certainly the best way to return to the parking area after a long day hiking up to the falls and returning later in the day.

Finally you will see the last footbridge, reconnecting with the Lower Trail, and continuing for about five minutes to the parking area. You have completed your 4-mile (possibly more, depending on which choices you made) adventure to Cascade Falls.

The End.

My Recommended Route

Did you make it to the end of the adventure? I’m sure you did…and if you’re like me, you read all the possible routes! Now that you’ve read through the possibilities, I wanted to tell you how I hiked the adventure and what I would recommend.

I took the Lower Trail all the way to Cascade Falls. I enjoyed the scenic route, stopping to capture photos at a few locations along the way. Once I cross the second bridge I actually picked up my pace just a bit because I had already taken two hours just to hike the first mile. Don’t worry, it probably won’t take you that long! I was stopping to capture long exposure photos of small waterfalls, so it took me longer. I definitely could have enjoyed the second half of the Lower Trail some more, making it just as much a destination as Cascade Falls!

For my return trip, I climbed up the hill and took the Upper Trail back all the way. At this point I was quite a bit tired, clouds had covered the sky and blotted out the sunlight, and I just wanted to get back to my car. Now, what I wish I had done was taken the Upper Trail back halfway, then switched over to the Lower Trail for the last mile.

My recommendation? If you have a group of teens and/or adults, I suggest taking the Lower Trail all the way the falls, then returning on half of the Lower Trail and half of the Upper Trail on the way back, whichever one you want to do first. If you have children, I have to recommend the Upper Trail all the way to the falls, but take the first half of the Lower Trail back, and switch to the Upper Trail for the final mile.

However, for the uber-adventurous I-want-to-climb-Mt.-Everest people, you can actually spend an entire day out there just hiking all the options for a thrilling good time. Take the Lower Trail first to the second bridge, then take the Upper Trail to the falls. When you leave the falls, take the Lower Trail back to the first bridge. Instead of heading back to the car, take the Upper Trail to the second bridge, crossing over to the Lower Trail to see the falls a second time. Finally, take the Upper Trail all the way back to the parking area. In total you will have hiked about 8 miles with a minimum time of 4 hours.

So, what adventure did you choose?

Pin this article! Follow me on Pinterest for more travel inspiration.

3 Comments

  1. jkakers December 10, 2014 at 9:56 PM - Reply

    This is beautiful! I hope to be able to visit this some time soon when I’m down for a visit!

  2. […] Read “Choose Your Own Adventure at Cascade Falls in Pembroke, VA” here… […]

Leave A Comment